Blurred Motion

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS – Arse Bag

Christmas decorations in Oxford Street; London; England

The Shoot:

I arrive early to ensure I am in prime position for optimum light.  After a little fine-tuning, I set up and take a few practice frames.  The light ratios are wrong so I gather my equipment close and decide on a course of vigilance, while pretending that standing in the middle of the road with a large camera and silly hair won’t draw any attention.  This quickly proves wrong, as I am approached by several members of the constabulary who politely enquire as to what I am filming. After several minutes of scrolling through pics and a short introductory class in basic photography, they seem satisfied that I am not about to unleash any photographic terror on the capital.

On their departure, I turn to reassess the shot and can’t help but notice a man of unusual gait walking along the central reservation towards me.  He is pulling a shopping carrier behind him and advancing at a slow but steady speed.  I note that my tripod may be slightly blocking his path but there should be just enough room for him to pass by.  As the man approaches the leg of the tripod, it becomes clear that this small, mid-road section of Oxford Street was intended entirely for his own private use and that I am very much in his way.  So much so, in fact, that he asks me, “Do you have to put that there?” I feel sure that this is a rhetorical question but whilst I am contemplating if I should explain whether I actually have to place the tripod in this exact location, his distress magnifies and he announces loudly that I am an “Arse Bag”  and kicks my tripod.

The Shot: Uptight pedestrians aside, the main difficulty of the shot itself was waiting for the buses from either direction to coincide.  Finding the right shutter speed to show enough movement and allow time for the traffic to pass by from both directions was a little tricky.  I found swearing loudly helped.

Technical: Canon 1DS III, Canon 24mm TS-E, ISO 100, F16, 8 Secs, Lowepro CompuTrekker